How papers in the Big Apple played Mario Cuomo today on page one

It’s not often you’ll find a sameness to the front pages of New York’s largest newspapers. But today is one of the days you will.

Mario Cuomo — former governor of the state and the father of the current governor — passed away Thursday at the age of 82. All three of the major city tabs featured Cuomo on page one today, each with a thoughtful portrait of the man in his prime.

150102MarioCuomoTabs

The Post comes out on top with the most visually appealing presentation: Those red-and-white stripes — a flag, presumably — really catch the eye. But the Daily News also wins for the funniest headline.

The Post‘s photo is from photo service Demotix. The Daily News‘ comes from Getty Images. Newsday‘s cover photo is by freelancer Charles Eckert.

Joining the “thoughtful, hand-on-chin” portraitfest today is the New York Times.

150102MarioCuomoNYTimes

That one was shot by Times staffer and noted portrait photographer Fred R. Conrad.

All four of these front pages are from the Newseum. Of course.

In bookstores today: A memoir by the NYT’s Charles Blow

New York Times OpEd columnist — and former graphics director — Charles Blow has a new book that hits bookstores today.

1408FireShutUpInMyBones

It’s called Fire Shut Up in My Bones, and it’s a memoir of his formative years growing up in Louisiana.

The title is a reference to the Old Testament of the Bible. This is Jeremiah, chapter 20, verses eight and nine:

8. For each time I speak, I cry aloud; I proclaim violence and destruction, Because for me the word of the Lord has resulted In reproach and derision all day long.

9. But if I say, “I will not remember Him or speak anymore in His name,” Then in my heart it becomes like a burning fire Shut up in my bones; And I am weary of holding it in, And I cannot endure it.

The official book blurb says:

Blow’s attachment to his mother — a fiercely driven woman with five sons, brass knuckles in her glove box, a job plucking poultry at a nearby factory, a soon-to-be-ex husband, and a love of newspapers and learning — cannot protect him from secret abuse at the hands of an older cousin. It’s damage that triggers years of anger and searing self-questioning.

Finally, Blow escapes to a nearby state university, where he joins a black fraternity after a passage of brutal hazing, and then enters a world of racial and sexual privilege that feels like everything he’s ever needed and wanted, until he’s called upon, himself, to become the one perpetuating the shocking abuse.

A powerfully redemptive memoir that both fits the tradition of African-American storytelling from the South, and gives it an indelible new slant.

Charles’ days as “just” a visuals manager are long gone, of course. He’s now a visual columnist for the Times and a constant presence on the cable TV new talk shows.

1308CharlesBlowOnCnn

The people he hangs with these days are giving the book rave reviews.

Gwen Ifill of PBS Newshour writes:

Page by elegant page, Charles Blow has constructed an eloquent and courageous memoir that explains why black and white is never just that—whether it comes to race or the rich, conflicted stew of childhood memory.

CNN’s Anderson Cooper says the book is…

Powerful…so well-written.

Alice Walker, author of the Color Purple calls the memoir…

…a luminous memoir that digs deep into territory I’ve longed to read about in black men’s writing: into the horror of being submerged in a vast drowning swirl of racial, spiritual, and sexual complexity, only to somehow find one’s self afloat, though gasping for breath, and then, at long last and at great cost, swimming. I believe both Ancestors and Descendants will cheer.

Harvard professor and Oxford African American Studies Center director Henry Louis Gates says:

Above all, this is the story of a courageously honest man arriving at his decision to ‘stop running like the river . . . and just be the ocean, vast, deep, and exactly where it was always meant to be.’ Blow has written a classic memoir of a truly American childhood.

The Times ran an excerpt of the book on the cover of its Sunday Review section this past weekend. It’s pretty strong stuff. Read that here.

Like I said, the book is officially published today. You should be able to find it in your local bookstore. Naturally, it’s available at Amazon — currently for $17.08. Barnes and Noble is selling it for just 17 cents more.

Charles has embarked on a rather ambitious book tour. Last night, he was on Anderson Cooper 360. Today, he’s doing NPR’s Fresh Air, SiriusXM Satellite Radio and the Lawrence O’Donnell‘s Last Word on MSNBC.

Tomorrow, he’s doing a live chat with the Huffington Post, a radio show on WAMC in New York and MSNBC’s the Cycle. AFter that, he heads to Los Angeles, where he’ll be on Real Time with Bill Maher on Friday.

Naturally, he’ll be hitting bookstores, book fairs and the like along the way. Find his complete schedule here.

1408CharlesBlowMug

A 1992 magna cum laude graduate at Grambling State University, Charles worked as a graphic artist at the Detroit News before joining the New York Times in 1994. He was promoted to graphics director and then to design director for news. He left in 2006 to become art director of National Geographic magazine but rejoined the Times in 2008 in his current position.

Find Charles’ web site here, his blog here, his column archive here and his “public figure” Facebook page here. Find his Twitter feed here.

Charles is a really great guy. I’ll never forget the kind words he had for me 14 years ago after my first big national-level presentation at SND/Minneapolis. His enthusiastic support filled me with confidence about my teaching skills as well as my work as a visuals leader.

I have a copy of Fire Shut Up in my Bones on order and I hope to get it signed one day soon.

Here’s wishing Charles the best of luck.

A prototype for a new-and-improved Obamacare web site

Wednesday, the New York Times ran a piece on its OpEd page by Ezekiel J. Emanuel of the University of Pennsylvania on how to repair its big mess of an Obamacare insurance exchange web site.

This is how the Times illustrated that story:

131023NewYorkTimesOpEdArt

Genius.

Consultant David Cole of the Cole Group and News Inc. thought so, too. In the email in which he alerted me to it, David writes:

It may well have been done in HyperCard, though some of the AUI is wrong (the alert box would have all been in Chicago, with no Monaco).

A nice touch was to replace the Apple symbol in the menubar with a bitmapped Obama logo.

131023UpperLeftHandCorner

Anyway, warmed the heart of this 1980s and 1990s HyperCard enthusiast.

The illustration was credited to typographer Dan Cassaro. Find Dan’s web site here.

Minneapolis Star Tribune’s Andrew Braford joining the NYT

Andrew Braford — a designer for the Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Minn. — posted this rather low-key announcement this weekend via his Facebook timeline:

A bit of news: Holly and I are leaving Minneapolis to move to New York City, where I’ve taken a job with the New York Times.

Pressed for details, Andrew tells us:

We are pretty excited about it. I’m going as a designer, where I’ll be used across all the news sections. I start there Oct. 14.

1102AndrewBrafordMug

A 1991 graduate of the University of North Dakota, Andrew spent nearly 8 years at the Grand Forks (N.D.) Herald and a year at the Post-Tribune of Gary, Ind., before moving to a design job at the Wichita Eagle in 1997. He moved to the Pioneer Press of St. Paul, Minn., in 2000 and then to the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch in 2001 before joining the St. Petersburg Times in 2005. By the time he left St. Pete in 2011 to move back to the Twin Cities, Andrew had worked his way up to deputy design director.

A few samples of his work…

121231StribAdrianPetersonPoster.jpg  110227AndrewBrafordSample02
110227AndrewBrafordSample01  110227AndrewBrafordSample03




Find more in Andrew’s NewsPageDesigner portfolio.

Find his portfolio here and his Twitter feed here.

Andrew’s wife, Holly, also worked as a designer at the St. Pete Times and is currently the Strib‘s niche products manager. Andrew tells us:

Holly isn’t exactly sure what she is going to do. She is probably going to spend a bunch of time with Delia and do some freelance work.

Find Holly’s portfolio here and her Twitter feed here.

Behind the New York Times’ look at a Boston Marathon bombing victim

This story is about an extraordinary print and digital presentation earlier this week in the New York Times.

But first, the background.

New York Times sports designer Wayne Kamidoi fills us in:

Tim Rohan was in Boston on Monday to file a “game story”  for the sports section about the elite runners in the race who had finished a few hours earlier. He was in the media room in a hotel a few blocks from the finish line, preparing to write his story. Then, the explosion. Rohan would contribute reporting to The Times‘s breaking-news coverage.

You may be familiar with this picture of the Boston Marathon bombings:

130708CharlesKrupaPhoto

That famous shot by Charles Krupa of the Associated Press was used by a number of news outlets, but nearly always cropped like that. What you might not have seen was a version in which you can see what’s left of Jeff Bauman‘s legs, dangling beneath his knees.

The photos exist — Google them if you must — but I’d rather not post them here.

Wayne picks up the story again:

Rohan, in search of any victims the next day, first encountered Jeff Bauman’s family the day after the bombing and filed this sidebar on Tuesday evening.

He finally met Jeff Bauman on the weekend, after asking the family permission to tell Jeff’s story. Rohan and Times photographer Josh Haner soon began following Jeff’s recovery for about the next seven weeks, sometimes up to five or six days a week.

And that’s what the story was about in Monday’s New York Times sports section: The journey Bauman has been on as he deals with the loss of his legs.

Wayne collected a quote for us from the reporter:

“Jeff got more comfortable with us the more we were there,” Rohan wrote in an email. “And the more we were there, the better we came to understand Jeff. The best stuff in my story was not from any sit-down interview, but rather when it was just Jeff and I in his room, or at physical therapy, and we were chatting about the Red Sox.”

The print version consisted of Monday’s sports front and two inside doubletrucks. Click on any of these pages for a larger look:

130708NytMarathon01

Bauman was standing near the finish line in Boston in order to watch his girlfriend finish her first marathon. Instead, he lost his legs, was punctured in his upper arm and suffered horrific burns.

Wayne tells us:

Sam Manchester designed the four inside pages, which was an arduous task. Josh, who also shot the video, had so many compelling images to choose from.

130708NytMarathon0405

Becky Lebowitz was the picture editor. Sam could fill a Dumpster with all of his proofs of variations of the spreads.

130708NytMarathon0607

I had a much easier task of designing the centerpiece for the cover. The main goal there was: Get out the way of the photographs. An earlier prototype (see attached) had a much looser crop on the main image. Credit Fred Conrad, a staff photographer, for the suggestion.

130708NytMarathon01Ruff  130708NytMarathon01

The digital version, as you’d expect, is every bit the equal of the print version.

130708NYTOnline

The entire prose story is there, along with an extensive picture gallery and a video in which we see Bauman fitted for new $200,000 state-of-the-art prosthetic legs…

130708NytVideo01

…and then try them out, with the support of his girlfriend.

130708NytVideo02

Clearly, Bauman still has a long way to go. But he’s made a great start.

Find the online version here.

Wayne tells us:

The project has been a success, drawing big viewing numbers especially from sharing on social media outlets. “The writing, the photos, the video, the web design, the print design — all of those things were great,” said Jason Stallman, the sports editor. “But the reason the whole package resonated with so many readers, I think, is the decision that Mr. Bauman made to give us unfettered access so other people could learn from his experience.”

Right about now, you might be thinking: Hmm. Tim Rohan sounds awfully familiar. Have I seen that name somewhere before?

You might have indeed. Wayne explains:

Rohan, who joined The Times as a summer intern in June 2012, is no stranger to witnessing breaking news. His first assignment was to cover a Mets game against the St. Louis Cardinals on a Friday night. Johan Santana proceeded to throw the first no-hitter in Mets history.

120602NytSportsSantanaNoHit

Go here to find Jim Romenesko‘s report about that.

1307TimRohanMug

Rohan is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he covered women’s hoops, hockey and football for the student daily. Find his Twitter feed here.

Average daily circulation for the New York Times is 1,586,757.

Behind the New York Times’ look at a Boston Marathon bombing victim

This story is about an extraordinary print and digital presentation earlier this week in the New York Times.

But first, the background.

New York Times sports designer Wayne Kamidoi fills us in:

Tim Rohan was in Boston on Monday to file a “game story”  for the sports section about the elite runners in the race who had finished a few hours earlier. He was in the media room in a hotel a few blocks from the finish line, preparing to write his story. Then, the explosion. Rohan would contribute reporting to The Times‘s breaking-news coverage.

You may be familiar with this picture of the Boston Marathon bombings:

130708CharlesKrupaPhoto

That famous shot by Charles Krupa of the Associated Press was used by a number of news outlets, but nearly always cropped like that. What you might not have seen was a version in which you can see what’s left of Jeff Bauman‘s legs, dangling beneath his knees.

The photos exist — Google them if you must — but I’d rather not post them here.

Wayne picks up the story again:

Rohan, in search of any victims the next day, first encountered Jeff Bauman’s family the day after the bombing and filed this sidebar on Tuesday evening.

He finally met Jeff Bauman on the weekend, after asking the family permission to tell Jeff’s story. Rohan and Times photographer Josh Haner soon began following Jeff’s recovery for about the next seven weeks, sometimes up to five or six days a week.

And that’s what the story was about in Monday’s New York Times sports section: The journey Bauman has been on as he deals with the loss of his legs.

Wayne collected a quote for us from the reporter:

“Jeff got more comfortable with us the more we were there,” Rohan wrote in an email. “And the more we were there, the better we came to understand Jeff. The best stuff in my story was not from any sit-down interview, but rather when it was just Jeff and I in his room, or at physical therapy, and we were chatting about the Red Sox.”

The print version consisted of Monday’s sports front and two inside doubletrucks. Click on any of these pages for a larger look:

130708NytMarathon01

Bauman was standing near the finish line in Boston in order to watch his girlfriend finish her first marathon. Instead, he lost his legs, was punctured in his upper arm and suffered horrific burns.

Wayne tells us:

Sam Manchester designed the four inside pages, which was an arduous task. Josh, who also shot the video, had so many compelling images to choose from.

130708NytMarathon0405

Becky Lebowitz was the picture editor. Sam could fill a Dumpster with all of his proofs of variations of the spreads.

130708NytMarathon0607

I had a much easier task of designing the centerpiece for the cover. The main goal there was: Get out the way of the photographs. An earlier prototype (see attached) had a much looser crop on the main image. Credit Fred Conrad, a staff photographer, for the suggestion.

130708NytMarathon01Ruff  130708NytMarathon01

The digital version, as you’d expect, is every bit the equal of the print version.

130708NYTOnline

The entire prose story is there, along with an extensive picture gallery and a video in which we see Bauman fitted for new $200,000 state-of-the-art prosthetic legs…

130708NytVideo01

…and then try them out, with the support of his girlfriend.

130708NytVideo02

Clearly, Bauman still has a long way to go. But he’s made a great start.

Find the online version here.

Wayne tells us:

The project has been a success, drawing big viewing numbers especially from sharing on social media outlets. “The writing, the photos, the video, the web design, the print design — all of those things were great,” said Jason Stallman, the sports editor. “But the reason the whole package resonated with so many readers, I think, is the decision that Mr. Bauman made to give us unfettered access so other people could learn from his experience.”

Right about now, you might be thinking: Hmm. Tim Rohan sounds awfully familiar. Have I seen that name somewhere before?

You might have indeed. Wayne explains:

Rohan, who joined The Times as a summer intern in June 2012, is no stranger to witnessing breaking news. His first assignment was to cover a Mets game against the St. Louis Cardinals on a Friday night. Johan Santana proceeded to throw the first no-hitter in Mets history.

120602NytSportsSantanaNoHit

Go here to find Jim Romenesko‘s report about that.

1307TimRohanMug

Rohan is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he covered women’s hoops, hockey and football for the student daily. Find his Twitter feed here.

Average daily circulation for the New York Times is 1,586,757.

Behind the New York Times’ look at a Boston Marathon bombing victim

This story is about an extraordinary print and digital presentation earlier this week in the New York Times.

But first, the background.

New York Times sports designer Wayne Kamidoi fills us in:

Tim Rohan was in Boston on Monday to file a “game story”  for the sports section about the elite runners in the race who had finished a few hours earlier. He was in the media room in a hotel a few blocks from the finish line, preparing to write his story. Then, the explosion. Rohan would contribute reporting to The Times‘s breaking-news coverage.

You may be familiar with this picture of the Boston Marathon bombings:

130708CharlesKrupaPhoto

That famous shot by Charles Krupa of the Associated Press was used by a number of news outlets, but nearly always cropped like that. What you might not have seen was a version in which you can see what’s left of Jeff Bauman‘s legs, dangling beneath his knees.

The photos exist — Google them if you must — but I’d rather not post them here.

Wayne picks up the story again:

Rohan, in search of any victims the next day, first encountered Jeff Bauman’s family the day after the bombing and filed this sidebar on Tuesday evening.

He finally met Jeff Bauman on the weekend, after asking the family permission to tell Jeff’s story. Rohan and Times photographer Josh Haner soon began following Jeff’s recovery for about the next seven weeks, sometimes up to five or six days a week.

And that’s what the story was about in Monday’s New York Times sports section: The journey Bauman has been on as he deals with the loss of his legs.

Wayne collected a quote for us from the reporter:

“Jeff got more comfortable with us the more we were there,” Rohan wrote in an email. “And the more we were there, the better we came to understand Jeff. The best stuff in my story was not from any sit-down interview, but rather when it was just Jeff and I in his room, or at physical therapy, and we were chatting about the Red Sox.”

The print version consisted of Monday’s sports front and two inside doubletrucks. Click on any of these pages for a larger look:

130708NytMarathon01

Bauman was standing near the finish line in Boston in order to watch his girlfriend finish her first marathon. Instead, he lost his legs, was punctured in his upper arm and suffered horrific burns.

Wayne tells us:

Sam Manchester designed the four inside pages, which was an arduous task. Josh, who also shot the video, had so many compelling images to choose from.

130708NytMarathon0405

Becky Lebowitz was the picture editor. Sam could fill a Dumpster with all of his proofs of variations of the spreads.

130708NytMarathon0607

I had a much easier task of designing the centerpiece for the cover. The main goal there was: Get out the way of the photographs. An earlier prototype (see attached) had a much looser crop on the main image. Credit Fred Conrad, a staff photographer, for the suggestion.

130708NytMarathon01Ruff  130708NytMarathon01

The digital version, as you’d expect, is every bit the equal of the print version.

130708NYTOnline

The entire prose story is there, along with an extensive picture gallery and a video in which we see Bauman fitted for new $200,000 state-of-the-art prosthetic legs…

130708NytVideo01

…and then try them out, with the support of his girlfriend.

130708NytVideo02

Clearly, Bauman still has a long way to go. But he’s made a great start.

Find the online version here.

Wayne tells us:

The project has been a success, drawing big viewing numbers especially from sharing on social media outlets. “The writing, the photos, the video, the web design, the print design — all of those things were great,” said Jason Stallman, the sports editor. “But the reason the whole package resonated with so many readers, I think, is the decision that Mr. Bauman made to give us unfettered access so other people could learn from his experience.”

Right about now, you might be thinking: Hmm. Tim Rohan sounds awfully familiar. Have I seen that name somewhere before?

You might have indeed. Wayne explains:

Rohan, who joined The Times as a summer intern in June 2012, is no stranger to witnessing breaking news. His first assignment was to cover a Mets game against the St. Louis Cardinals on a Friday night. Johan Santana proceeded to throw the first no-hitter in Mets history.

120602NytSportsSantanaNoHit

Go here to find Jim Romenesko‘s report about that.

1307TimRohanMug

Rohan is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he covered women’s hoops, hockey and football for the student daily. Find his Twitter feed here.

Average daily circulation for the New York Times is 1,586,757.

Today’s media must-read

120726RantAdvanceFail

The New York Times David Carr — in a story entitled Newspaper monopoly that lost its grip — completely disassembles Advance Publications:

The name Times-Picayune, which had stood for quality and civic constancy for decades, does not mean the same thing anymore. The vaunted Web site that was to be the lifeblood of the new enterprise remains a creaky mess, and the newsroom has been denuded of remarkably talented people.

…Advance made its decisions up against some very dark trends in the business, but they were made with the dead-eyed arrogance of a monopolist in a much-changed world. Columbia Journalism Review described The Times-Picayune’s strategy of the last year as a “rolling disaster.”

It’s been a jaw-dropping blunder to watch. Advance misjudged the marketplace — the whole city and state went ballistic when the changes were announced — and failed to execute a modern digital strategy. Now it is in full retreat with new competition.

Well, don’t just sit there. Go read it here.

Why pay a copy writer when you can have dummy copy in your ad for free?

Over the years we’ve spent chronicling the hazards of operating without copy editors, we’ve seen newspapers accidentally run what is called “dummy copy” in headlines…

130310HarrisburgDummyHeadline

…we’ve seen lots and lots of TV stations do it…

120901NebraskaGameError

…and we’ve even seen it happen in advertising brochures.

But I don’t think I’ve ever seen dummy copy in an online ad. Because it’d be so easy to catch and to fix. Especially if the ad is going to run in the New York Times web site. If you’re an theater owner who can afford to advertise your show on the New York Times web site, then you can afford a copy editor. Right?

Evidently not.

130415NytTheaterAdError

You see the two critic’s blurbs on either side of the Matilda logo, right? Here’s a closer look at one of them.

130415NytTheaterAdError02

Well, that’s one way to attract eyeballs.

Thanks to Henry Howard of the American Legion for the tip.

You know who else needs a copy editor?

Local TV news operations. Chicago’s WMAQ-TV in particular. And WLS-TV, also of Chicago. And Harrisburg’s Fox43 TV news. And WDAY-TV 6 News in Fargo, N.D. And Local 15 News in Mobile, Ala. And WMAR-TV in Baltimore. And WBAL-TV in Baltimore. And Fox 4 KDFW in Dallas. And DFW Channel 11 in Dallas/Fort Worth. And KTLA channel 5 in Los Angeles. And KNBC channel 4 in Los Angeles. And KCBS channel 2 in Los Angeles. And KSDK in St. Louis. And Fox 4 News in Kansas City. And Charlotte’s WBTV. And KXAN-TV of Austin. And WFSB channel 3 in Hartford, Conn. And KOKI-TV, Fox23 in Tulsa. And Fox23 of Tulsa again. And Huntsville’s WAFF-TV. And WSPA-TV 7 in Spartanburg, S.C. And Miami’s WSVN channel 7. And KUSA 9 News in Denver, Colo. And 7News, also in Denver. And KSL channel 5 in Salt Lake City. And KCRG of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. And WXYZ-TV in Detroit. And KGMI News Talk radio in Bellingham, Wash. And local Fox affiliates. And other local TV news operations. And CBS local media. And CBS/DC in Washington. And the web operation for DC101 radio. And the Huffington Post. And the Huffington Post again. And CNN (and CNN again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and a huge one here)(and yet again)(and yet again) and CNN Money and CNN mobile and Fox News (and Fox News again)(and Fox News yet again)(and again!)(and again!)(and yet again!)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and again, for cryin’ out loud)(and yet again)(and again)(and yet again) and Fox Business and MSNBC (and MSNBC again) (and MSNBC again) (and MSNBC yet again)(and MSNBC yet again) and ABC News and NBC news and NBC News again and NBC News yet again and the Weather Channel (and the Weather Channel again)(and the Weather Channel again)(and the Weather Channel yet again) and the BBC and the BBC again and German news channel N24. And the Canadian Broadcast Corp. (and the CBC again). And Fairfax media of New Zealand. And Dagsrevyen, the evening news broadcast of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corp. And al Jazeera. And Martha Stewart’s TV operation. And the Disney Channel. And AOL. And AOL’s Patch. And Patch again. And Advance’s MLive media group. And creators of mobile apps. And Yahoo News. And Yahoo News again. And Yahoo News again. And the fictional TMI! web site on the Newsroom TV show. And Google News’ bots. And baseball jersey manufacturers. And football jersey manufacturers. And sports ticket counterfeiters. And the NCAA. And the Big 12 Conference. And Georgetown University. And Kansas State University. And the University of Iowa. And the University of North Carolina. And the University of Texas. And Nebraska Wesleyan University. And Appalachian State University. And high school diploma printers. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings, the Minnesota Twins the St. Louis Cardinals, the Seattle Mariners, the New York Yankees and the Washington Nationals (boy, do they need a copy editor). And the Brooklyn Nets. And Manchester United. And the National Hockey League (and the NHL again). And the NHL Network. And NBA Premium TV. And ESPN (and ESPN again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and three more times!)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and again) and Fox Sports (and Fox Sports again)(and Fox Sports one more time)(and Fox Sports yet again)(and yet again)(and yet again). And NBC Sports. And NBC Sports again. And CBS Sportsline. And TBS Sports. And CNN.SI. And Sports Illustrated (and again) (and again). And college athletic department ticket offices. And the NCAA. And Leaf trading card company. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And the makers of Sudafed. And Borders bookstore. And the U.S. Postal Service. And government agencies and political candidates. And Tea Party candidates. And the Newt Gingrich campaign. And the Mitt Romney campaign. And the Mitt Romney campaign again. And the White House. And the Vice President. And the President himself. And city and county Boards of Elections. And Congressmen from South Carolina. Both the state of Pennsylvania and its department of transportation. And Costa Cruises. And Pittsburgh skywriters. And road paving contractors in Durham, N.C. and in New York City. And the city of Norfolk, Va. And the Ohio Dept. of Transportation. And the Alabama Dept. of Transportation. And the Maryland Dept. of Transportation. And the West Palm Beach, Fla., police dept. And Lakewood High School in St. Petersburg, Fla. And Sunrise-McMillan Elementary School in Fort Worth, Texas. And Canadian school districts. And planners for Charlotte, N.C.’s Festival in the Park. And the Moose lodge in Carroll, Iowa. And South African traffic cops. And the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico. And gas stations. And billboard companies. And bumper sticker manufacturers. And sign painters. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.“ And T-shirt designers. And more T-shirt designers. And Old Navy. And Old Navy again. And Kohl’s. And Target. And Lids. And Adidas. And Mazda. And rubber stamp designers. And glass etchers. And stone carvers. And hotels. And more hotels. And manufacturers of custom-printed hotel accessories. And Starbucks. And Wendy’s. And Applebee‘s. And DaVanni’s Pizza. And restaurants, breakfast joints, Chinese restaurants and cake decorators. And more cake decorators. And drive-in movie theater managers. And auto dealers. And auto body shops. And romance novelists. And Capcom, the makers of Resident Evil video games. And 2K Sports, the makers of NBA 2K13 video games. And Hasbro. And the Ku Klux Klan. And American Idol. And book cover designers. And editorial cartoonists. And business page editors. And South Africa’s New Age and Sunday Independent newspapers. And City Press of Johannesburg. And Dublin’s Sunday Business Post. And the Echo of Gloucestershire, England. And the London Daily Mail. And the National Post of Toronto, Canada. And the Winnipeg Sun. And the South China Morning Post. And the Herald Sun of Melbourne, Australia. And la Razon of Buenos Aires, Argentina. And the Air Force Times. And the Washington Post (Hey! Another repeat offender!), the Post’s Express tab (Hey! Yet another repeat offender!), the Washington Examiner, Boston’s Metro, the New York Times (Wow! Yet another repeat offender!)(Hey! A third offense!)(Hey! A fourth offense!)(Hey! A fifth error!),  A.M. New York, the Los Angeles Times (and the LAT again), the New York Post, the New York Post again, the New York Post yet again, Wall Street Journal Europe, Newsday, USA Today, (and USA Today again), (and USA Today again)(and USA Today again), the Boston Globe, the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times (and yet another!), the Daily Herald of Arlington Heights, Ill., the Rochester, N.Y., Democrat & Chronicle, the Daily Mail of London, the Echo of Liverpool, England, the Seattle Times, the weekly Manila Mail of San Francisco, the Miami Herald (and again!), the Portland Oregonian, the Durham, N.C., Herald-Sun, the News & Observer of Raleigh, N.C. (and the News & Observer again!)(and again!)(and again!)(and yet again!), the Chapel Hill, N.C., News, the Times-News of Hendersonville, N.C., the Greensboro, N.C., News & Record, Advance Publications’ Birmingham design hub, the Tampa Bay Times, the Missoula, Mont., Missoulian, the Duluth, Minn., News Tribune, the Free Press of Mankato, Minn., the Springfield (Mass.) Republican, the Reformer of Brattleboro, Vt., the Bangor (Maine) Daily News, the Advocate of Stamford, Conn., the Hartford (Conn.) Courant, the Times-Record of Denton, Md., the News-Herald of Willoughby, Ohio, the Reporter of Lansdale, Pa., the Times-News of Erie, Pa., the Tribune-Review of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, Pa., the Wilmington, Del., News Journal, the Dispatch of Casa Grande, Ariz., the Amarillo (Texas) Globe News, the Laredo Morning Times, the El Paso Times, the Daily Telegram of Temple, Texas, the Independent of Rayne, La., the Huntsville (Ala.) Times, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Cleveland Heights Sun Press, the Daily Times of Weirton, W.Va., the Waynesboro News Virginian, the Virginian-Pilot (and the Virginian-Pilot again) (and the Virginian-Pilot yet again), the Des Moines (Iowa) Register (and the Des Moines Register again), the Coon Rapids (Iowa) Enterprise, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, Gannett’s N.Y. Central Media hub, the Greenville (S.C.) News, the Gazette Journal of Reno, Nev., the Daily Herald of Provo, Utah, the Deseret News of Salt Lake City, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Fort Collins Coloradoan, the Denver Post, the Olympian of Olympia, Wash., the Anchorage (Alaska) Daily News, the Bakersfield Californian, the Pine Cone, of Carmel, Calif., the Carbondale, Ill., Southern Illinoisian, the Lakeland (Fla.) Ledger (Hey! Yet another repeat offender!) and the Canarsie Courier of New York City. And Politico. And the National Examiner. And the Associated Press. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press yet again. And the Associated Press yet again. And the Associated Press yet again. And yet again. And Mann’s Jeweler’s Accent magazine. And New Scientist magazine. And Investment News magazine. And Time magazine (and Time magazine again). And Editor & Publisher.

And, of course, I need a copy editor myself.

I’ve always needed a copy editor. Which is why you’ll see me fight so hard for them.

Why I don’t mind the spadea wrapped around Monday’s NYT

Yes, that was a spadea wrapped around the front of Monday’s New York Times.

130402NewYorkTimesSpadea

This is new for New York Times readers. And one sent me that picture today.

Note how the front page portion of the spadea actually has news on it. Meaning that when the spadea is in place, the reader doesn’t really notice. The pull-away spadea wrap isn’t obtrusive.

It’s only when the reader pulls the spadea off the front of the paper that she sees the giant, gatefold advertisement within.

This beats hell out of the way that most newspapers use spadeas: To hide the news. I’ve probably used this example way too much, but I’m still stinging from this day in August 2011, when the Virginian-Pilot covered up an important — and visually spectacular — bit of news that involved war fatalities within a group that was based right there in Virginia Beach.

A month or so later, the St. Pete Times did the same thing when a beloved local sports hero passed away unexpectedly.

 

The San Francisco Chronicle had an advertising spadea scheduled one day a month later still. But when Steve Jobs died, the paper wisely moved the ad wrap to another section. Which preserved this presentation for potential newsstand buyers:

So I’m not so bothered by the Times‘ spadea. At least it’s not hiding news from the reader. I never saw the value in popping an ad in front of a reader who’s trying to look at our news product.

Nice work, Times.

And thanks to my tipster for the photo.

One of these front-page shenanigans a joke. One is not. Can you tell which is which?

I have two things to show you this morning.

Example No. 1: The front page of Monday’s Times Daily of Florence, Ala., where the editors decided to play a little April Fools’ joke on readers.130401FlorenceAlaAprilFool01

Can you see the lead art? Here’s a slightly larger look.

130401FlorenceAlaAprilFool02

Yes, that’s the Loch Ness Monster, Godzilla and a UFO floating over the Tennessee River in downtown Florence.

No, I didn’t especially like this. But allow me to make these points:

1. The photo is carefully labeled as a photoillustration.

2. It’s clearly not real. I mean, clearly.

3. The accompanying story also makes it clear this is a joke.

4. It was indeed a very slow news day. Presumably if actual news had broken, the editors would have ditched the illustration.

5. Was this photoillustration really any worse than, say, hiding Easter Eggs on page one? I think not.

Make no mistake: I don’t recommend you try an April Fools’ joke on page one. But I’ve seen what I consider worse. Like, for example…

Example No. 2: The front page of Sunday’s New York Times.

130331NewYorkTimesInstagram

Yes. That’s Instagram.

I feel strongly that no respectable newspaper should run a picture on page one — or any other page, for that matter — that would get a staffer fired if he or she had achieved the same effect with Photoshop.

It’s not the use of the Instagram app itself that I object to — Instagram is fine with me. Or the social media network that’s built into Instagram. Nor do I object to the use of an iPhone to take professional pictures. Just a matter of time, I think.

My issue here is with the artificial filters Instagram uses to give this picture the look it has. If you do the same with Photoshop, you’re manipulating the picture and you’ll get fired. Set Instagram to do it automatically and you’re on page one of the New York freakin’ Times.

And it’s not the first time the Times has done this. On the other hand, the TimesDamon Winter won a gigantic award for that work. So evidently, the photojournalism community doesn’t seem to mind. Neither do the folks at Poynter, as far as I can tell.

Did we just decide to give up on photo ethics? I missed that memo.

Average daily circulation for the New York Times is 1,586,757. The Times Daily of Florence, Ala., circulates 23,905 papers daily.

Thanks to Jim Romenesko for blogging about the Florence page today.

Both front pages are from the Newseum. Of course.

Two fairly obvious typos that a spell checker should have caught

Here are a couple of fairly obvious typos to brighten your Thursday — or to bring you down, depending on your point of view.

First up is this headline from the New York Times‘ web report Wednesday evening.

130321NewYorkTimesErrorHead01

Can’t see it? Here’s a closer view.

130321NewYorkTimesErrorHead02

I’m fairly certain the editor meant “Hornets.” What’s more, that headline is something you’d think a simple spell checker might catch.

From time to time, we catch the Times with a misspelled word in a headline. Here and here, for instance.

But neither of those were the worst online headline error for the New York Times. That would be this one right here.

Thanks to my anonymous tipster for the screen cap.

Meanwhile, joining my long, long list of local television label misspellings is this one from Fox 4 News in Kansas City, Mo.

130321FoxFourTVError

The word they were looking for, of course, was “Leagues.”

Let this be a lesson: The people typing in these headlines should work in league with a spellchecker.

Thanks to my old pal Carl Quirarte for the tip.

You know who else needs a copy editor?

Local TV news operations. Chicago’s WMAQ-TV in particular. And WLS-TV, also of Chicago. And Harrisburg’s Fox43 TV news. And WDAY-TV 6 News in Fargo, N.D. And Local 15 News in Mobile, Ala. And WMAR-TV in Baltimore. And WBAL-TV in Baltimore. And Fox 4 KDFW in Dallas. And DFW Channel 11 in Dallas/Fort Worth. And KTLA channel 5 in Los Angeles. And KNBC channel 4 in Los Angeles. And KCBS channel 2 in Los Angeles. And KSDK in St. Louis. And Charlotte’s WBTV. And KXAN-TV of Austin. And WFSB channel 3 in Hartford, Conn. And KOKI-TV, Fox23 in Tulsa. And Fox23 of Tulsa again. And Huntsville’s WAFF-TV. And WSPA-TV 7 in Spartanburg, S.C. And Miami’s WSVN channel 7. And KUSA 9 News in Denver, Colo. And 7News, also in Denver. And KSL channel 5 in Salt Lake City. And KCRG of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. And WXYZ-TV in Detroit. And KGMI News Talk radio in Bellingham, Wash. And local Fox affiliates. And other local TV news operations. And CBS local media. And CBS/DC in Washington. And the web operation for DC101 radio. And the Huffington Post. And the Huffington Post again. And CNN (and CNN again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and a huge one here)(and yet again)(and yet again) and CNN Money and CNN mobile and Fox News (and Fox News again)(and Fox News yet again)(and again!)(and again!)(and yet again!)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and again, for cryin’ out loud)(and yet again)(and again) and Fox Business and MSNBC (and MSNBC again) (and MSNBC again) (and MSNBC yet again)(and MSNBC yet again) and ABC News and NBC news and NBC News again and NBC News yet again and the Weather Channel (and the Weather Channel again)(and the Weather Channel again)(and the Weather Channel yet again) and the BBC and the BBC again and German news channel N24. And the Canadian Broadcast Corp. (and the CBC again). And Fairfax media of New Zealand. And Dagsrevyen, the evening news broadcast of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corp. And al Jazeera. And Martha Stewart’s TV operation. And the Disney Channel. And AOL. And AOL’s Patch. And Patch again. And Advance’s MLive media group. And creators of mobile apps. And Yahoo News. And Yahoo News again. And Yahoo News again. And the fictional TMI! web site on the Newsroom TV show. And Google News’ bots. And baseball jersey manufacturers. And football jersey manufacturers. And sports ticket counterfeiters. And the NCAA. And the Big 12 Conference. And Georgetown University. And Kansas State University. And the University of Iowa. And the University of North Carolina. And the University of Texas. And Nebraska Wesleyan University. And Appalachian State University. And high school diploma printers. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings, the Minnesota Twins the St. Louis Cardinals, the Seattle Mariners, the New York Yankees and the Washington Nationals (boy, do they need a copy editor). And the Brooklyn Nets. And Manchester United. And the National Hockey League (and the NHL again). And the NHL Network. And NBA Premium TV. And ESPN (and ESPN again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and three more times!)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and again) and Fox Sports (and Fox Sports again)(and Fox Sports one more time)(and Fox Sports yet again)(and yet again)(and yet again). And NBC Sports. And NBC Sports again. And CBS Sportsline. And TBS Sports. And CNN.SI. And Sports Illustrated (and again) (and again). And college athletic department ticket offices. And the NCAA. And Leaf trading card company. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And the makers of Sudafed. And Borders bookstore. And the U.S. Postal Service. And government agencies and political candidates. And Tea Party candidates. And the Newt Gingrich campaign. And the Mitt Romney campaign. And the Mitt Romney campaign again. And the White House. And the Vice President. And the President himself. And city and county Boards of Elections. And Congressmen from South Carolina. Both the state of Pennsylvania and its department of transportation. And Costa Cruises. And Pittsburgh skywriters. And road paving contractors in Durham, N.C. and in New York City. And the city of Norfolk, Va. And the Ohio Dept. of Transportation. And the Alabama Dept. of Transportation. And the Maryland Dept. of Transportation. And the West Palm Beach, Fla., police dept. And Lakewood High School in St. Petersburg, Fla. And Sunrise-McMillan Elementary School in Fort Worth, Texas. And Canadian school districts. And planners for Charlotte, N.C.’s Festival in the Park. And the Moose lodge in Carroll, Iowa. And South African traffic cops. And the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico. And gas stations. And billboard companies. And bumper sticker manufacturers. And sign painters. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.“ And T-shirt designers. And more T-shirt designers. And Old Navy. And Old Navy again. And Kohl’s. And Lids. And Adidas. And Mazda. And rubber stamp designers. And glass etchers. And stone carvers. And hotels. And more hotels. And manufacturers of custom-printed hotel accessories. And Starbucks. And Wendy’s. And Applebee‘s. And DaVanni’s Pizza. And restaurants, breakfast joints, Chinese restaurants and cake decorators. And more cake decorators. And drive-in movie theater managers. And auto dealers. And auto body shops. And romance novelists. And Capcom, the makers of Resident Evil video games. And 2K Sports, the makers of NBA 2K13 video games. And the Ku Klux Klan. And American Idol. And book cover designers. And editorial cartoonists. And business page editors. And South Africa’s New Age and Sunday Independent newspapers. And City Press of Johannesburg. And Dublin’s Sunday Business Post. And the Echo of Gloucestershire, England. And the London Daily Mail. And the National Post of Toronto, Canada. And the Winnipeg Sun. And the South China Morning Post. And the Herald Sun of Melbourne, Australia. And la Razon of Buenos Aires, Argentina. And the Air Force Times. And the Washington Post (Hey! Another repeat offender!), the Post’s Express tab (Hey! Yet another repeat offender!), the Washington Examiner, Boston’s Metro, the New York Times (Wow! Yet another repeat offender!)(Hey! A third offense!)(Hey! A fourth offense!), A.M. New York, the Los Angeles Times (and the LAT again), the New York Post, the New York Post again, the New York Post yet again, Wall Street Journal Europe, Newsday, USA Today, (and USA Today again), (and USA Today again)(and USA Today again), the Boston Globe, the Chicago Sun-Times (and yet another!), the Daily Herald of Arlington Heights, Ill., the Rochester, N.Y., Democrat & Chronicle, the Daily Mail of London, the Echo of Liverpool, England, the Seattle Times, the weekly Manila Mail of San Francisco, the Miami Herald (and again!), the Portland Oregonian, the Durham, N.C., Herald-Sun, the News & Observer of Raleigh, N.C. (and the News & Observer again!)(and again!)(and again!)(and yet again!), the Chapel Hill, N.C., News, the Times-News of Hendersonville, N.C., the Greensboro, N.C., News & Record, Advance Publications’ Birmingham design hub, the Tampa Bay Times, the Missoula, Mont., Missoulian, the Duluth, Minn., News Tribune, the Free Press of Mankato, Minn., the Springfield (Mass.) Republican, the Reformer of Brattleboro, Vt., the Bangor (Maine) Daily News, the Advocate of Stamford, Conn., the Hartford (Conn.) Courant, the Times-Record of Denton, Md., the News-Herald of Willoughby, Ohio, the Reporter of Lansdale, Pa., the Times-News of Erie, Pa., the Tribune-Review of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, Pa., the Wilmington, Del., News Journal, the Dispatch of Casa Grande, Ariz., the Amarillo (Texas) Globe News, the Laredo Morning Times, the El Paso Times, the Daily Telegram of Temple, Texas, the Independent of Rayne, La., the Huntsville (Ala.) Times, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Cleveland Heights Sun Press, the Daily Times of Weirton, W.Va., the Waynesboro News Virginian, the Virginian-Pilot (and the Virginian-Pilot again) (and the Virginian-Pilot yet again), the Des Moines (Iowa) Register (and the Des Moines Register again), the Coon Rapids (Iowa) Enterprise, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, Gannett’s N.Y. Central Media hub, the Greenville (S.C.) News, the Gazette Journal of Reno, Nev., the Daily Herald of Provo, Utah, the Deseret News of Salt Lake City, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Fort Collins Coloradoan, the Denver Post, the Olympian of Olympia, Wash., the Anchorage (Alaska) Daily News, the Bakersfield Californian, the Pine Cone, of Carmel, Calif., the Carbondale, Ill., Southern Illinoisian, the Lakeland (Fla.) Ledger (Hey! Yet another repeat offender!) and the Canarsie Courier of New York City. And Politico. And the Associated Press. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press yet again. And the Associated Press yet again. And the Associated Press yet again. And yet again. And Mann’s Jeweler’s Accent magazine. And New Scientist magazine. And Investment News magazine. And Time magazine (and Time magazine again). And Editor & Publisher.

And, of course, I need a copy editor myself.

I’ve always needed a copy editor. Which is why you’ll see me fight so hard for them.

 

Five more fun March Madness pages for you

Monday, we looked at a handful of great March Madness front pages and special sections.

Today, we have a second batch for you. Click any of these for a much larger look…

NEW YORK TIMES

New York, N.Y.

Circulation: 1,586,757

Wayne Kamadoi tells us:

Sam Manchester working on these bubbles until the final buzzer before deadline.

130318MarchMadnessNewYorkTimes

By now, you guys know how I feel about bubble charts. But if the theme for your section — and your cover illustration — is carbonated soft drinks, then you have to go with a bubble chart on the front.

130318MarchMadnessNYTdetail

You just have to.

STAR TRIBUNE

Minneapolis, Minn.

Circulation: 300,330

Part of the brilliance of that Times section was playing off a completely unrelated but very popular — and timely — story in the news: New York Mayor Michael Boomberg‘s proposed ban on large soft drinks.

The folks at the Star Tribune in Minneapolis took a similarly oblique approach: The infamous Harlem Shake in place of “the big dance.”

130318MarchMadnessMinneapolis

Chris Carr tells us:

Our NCAA “Atlanta Shake” theme was a fun team effort, in print and in our video. An extra nod goes to retiring graphic artist Jim Freitag, who for over 30 years at the Star Tribune has tackled an incredibly wide range of design and graphic and art projects.

For this project, Jim drew us 134 mascots – 67 (minus Goldy Gopher) standing-around mascots (for the Shake’s first portion) and 67 dancing mascots (for the Shake punchline portion). We ended up using 82 of them after we downsized our plans as the Gophers went into the tank down the stretch. But thankfully, they made the tournament (the idea was toast if they would have been out) and we were able to uncork a fun themed presentation in print and online.

The video is fun a waste of 30 seconds; it stars 93-year-old sports columnist/local celebrity Sid Hartman and former Gopher and NBA’er Quincy Lewis:

130318MarchMadnessMinneaDetail01

130318MarchMadnessMinneaDetail02

PLAIN DEALER

Cleveland, Ohio

Circulation: 246,571

Here’s an illustration by Chris Morris for the cover of Monday’s bracket special section in the Plain Dealer.

130318MarchMadnessCleveland

Find that — and a handful of nice inside pages — on the Plain Dealer‘s Not-So-Plain-Dealer visuals blog.

SUN-SENTINEL

Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Circulation: 147,860

Next up: Designer Rachel Schallom of the Sun-Sentinel of South Florida sends along this Monday sports front:

130318MarchMadnessFortLauderdaleSports

The old-school illustrations are by local freelancer Jane Tasciotti. Find more of Jane’s work here.

EXPRESS-NEWS

San Antonio, Texas

Circulation: 139,099

And our last March Madness page includes just a bit of news. Josh Trudellwho exited the newspaper business five years ago — writes:

I’ve been working part-time at the San Antonio Express-News and was assigned last Sunday’s sports front. The centerpiece is about the lackluster regular season being bailed out by the excitement of the tournament.

130318MarchMadnessSanAntonioSports

My illustration, story by Tim Griffin.

Are you doing something cool for March Madness? Send PDFs and design credits to:

chuckapple [at] cox.net

A look at today’s Pope front pages

[Freshly updated with a few more credits that rolled in throughout the day Thursday…]

As you know, we have a new Pope. He’s from Argentina and is the first Pope ever from the Americas.

As you might imagine, papers in Argentina went crazy with the story today. But you can spot right away why I’m reluctant to spend a lot of time trying to analyze today’s front pages.

130314PopeClarin  130314PopeLaNacion  130314PopeElTerritorio

That’s right: The photo opportunities Wednesday were so limited that only a few shots emerged from Vatican City. Which gave today’s front pages an extremely homogeneous feeling.

Now, the good news is that those three papers…

  • Clarín of Buenos Aires, circulation 332,601
  • La Nacion of Buenos Aires, circulation 160,000
  • El Territorio of Posadas, circulation unknown

…each wanted the iconic shot of the day on page one. And they got it. Readers throughout Argentina will save today’s newspaper as a keepsake.

So even though, for news design purposes, I’m not thrilled with today’s front pages, readers probably are. And that’s what matters.

In addition — as you can see there — the Newseum expects today to be a high-traffic day with plenty of hot-linking and bandwidth stealing. So they slapped watermarks on everything today.

In the past, I’ve had a no-watermark rule here in the blog. But that’s just not practical, sadly enough. So we’ll grit our teeth and dive into a few notable front pages…

THAT SAME PICTURE…

…was used by many, many U.S. newspapers. Most were smart enough to use it well — even those that built enormous page-one packages.

Here are four of my favorites:

130314PopeBostonGlobe  130314PopeMilwaukee

130314PopeSanDiego  130314PopeNorfolkVa

The picture itself is by Gregorio Borgia of the Associated Press.

Top row:

  • Boston Globe, Boston Mass.; circulation 225,482
  • Journal Sentinel, Milwaukee, Wis.; circulation 185,710

Bottom row:

  • U-T San Diego, San Diego, Calif.; circulation 230,742
  • Virginian-Pilot, Norfolk, Va.; circulation 142,476

I realize I’m only showing my ignorance and unfamiliarity with Latin, but I wonder how many young people will look at that Virginian-Pilot headline and wonder: Why is there a line from Harry Potter on that page?

A VIEW FROM A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT ANGLE

Papers that didn’t use that yellow-backed AP picture likely used this one: A photo made by L’Osservatore Romano and also distributed by the Associated Press.

Interestingly, however, several papers that used this picture also chose to run secondary art where you could see the new Pope’s face.

130314PopeClevelandOhio

That’s the Cleveland, Ohio, Plain Dealer, circulation 246,571.

Here are two more examples of that same approach…

130314PopeHarrisburgPa 130314PopeNewarkNJ

…from the Patriot-News of Harrisburg, Pa. (circulation 70,446) and the Star Ledger of Newark, Pa., (circulation 278,940).

It’s just a coincidence that all three of those papers are Advance publications. I think.

FINDING THAT DIFFERENT PICTURE

A few newspapers managed to find lead art that most papers did not run on page one today.

For example, the New York Times chose this picture by Alessandro Bianchi of Reuters.

130314PopeNewYorkTimes

The Washington Post went with an over-the-shoulder, wave-at-the-crowd shot, but not the same one we saw a moment ago. this is another handout from L’Osservatore Romano but distributed by Reuters.

130314PopeWashingtonPost

Average daily circulation for the Post is 507,615. The Times circulates 1,586,757 papers daily.

REGIONAL TWINS

Because of the scarcity of variety of art, I’d imagine, what I call “regional twins” popped up all over the place today. This is what I call situations in which two papers with overlapping readership areas end up with similar front-page pictures and headlines.

My favorite example of this: Right here in Southern California. My own paper, the Orange County Register, cropped in tight on that picture you just saw on the front of the New York Times while the Los Angeles Times used a picture by Luca Bruno of the Associated Press. Yet, the pictures were shot from a similar angle. And check out the headlines.

130314PopeLATimes  130314PopeSantaAnaCalif

Average daily circulation for the LAT is 616,575. The OCR circulates 280,812.

MOST INTERESTING HEADLINE OF THE DAY

Speaking of headlines, I didn’t see many clever ones today. This one from the 12,387-circulation Pocono Record of Stroudsburg, Pa., struck me as one of the best.

130314PopeStroudsburgPa

That was written by staffer Tom Ostrosky, I’m told.

BALCONY SHOTS THAT SHOWED MORE BALCONY

A few papers chose pictures that were more loosely-cropped. To show off the pageantry of the event, I’d imagine.

Three of these papers appealed to me a great deal. I liked the orderly, structured feel of the 57,710-circulation Clarion-Ledger of Jackson, Miss.

130314PopeJacksonMiss

That photo is from AFP/Getty Images. I’m not sure where this one is from because the designer of today’s Star Press of Muncie, Ind., left off the credit.

130314PopeMuncieInd

Note, however, the way the designer — Catherine Pomiecko from the Louisville Design Studio, I’m told — placed the story and sidebar into that little white square at the bottom of the picture. And then echoed that with a transparent box at the top of the picture to hold the headline.

Average daily circulation for the Star Press is 20,305.

My favorite of these pages, however — and, indeed, my favorite page of the day — is this presentation by the Advocate of Victoria, Texas.

130314PopeVictoriaTexas

Wow. Now, that’s a poster front.

Advocate editor Chis Cobler tells us:

Presentation editor Kimiko Fieg [designed the page], although we discussed it a lot as a design team.

Average daily circulation for the Advocate is 26,531.

WRAPPIN’ THE POPE

And three papers — that I know of — let their huge Pope photos spill over onto the back page of their papers, creating a huge wrap.

The first two of these suffer from the same problem: While the entire wrap is quite nice, look at what readers are getting with their page-one display:

130314PopeHoy

Yep. The picture of the back of a Cardinal’s head.

When you design page one of a broadsheet, you have to stay mindful of what’s above the fold. Ditto for a tabloid wrap — you have to remember that some readers might only see page one in a news rack or in a convenience store.

That was Hoy, the Spanish-language daily published by the Chicago Tribune. Interestingly, the Sun-Times today had the same issue.

130314PopeChicagoSunTimes

Average daily circulation for the Sun-Times is 422,335. Hoy circulates about 60,000 papers daily.

Here is the only broadsheet wrap I saw today, and you won’t see it at the Newseum. The Beaver County Times of Beaver, Pa., didn’t contribute its front page today.

130314PopeBeaverCountyPa

As the TimesEric Hall explaines:

 The newsfolk let the sports editor give it a whirl.

And, sure enough, you see Eric’s approach: This is essentially a photo illustration, with a picture of the pope at the bottom and a huge shot of the crowd as a background.

Note how the Beaver County Times took its nameplate down to tiny size and placed it at the bottom of the page.

A FOCUS ON THE FOLLOWERS

While a few papers managed to show the enormous throng in St. Peter’s Square, this one paper scored points today by focusing on the rapturous look on the face of this woman in Argentina, reveling in the news that the new Pope is from Argentina.

130314PopeBostonHerald

The photo is from Reuters. I wish we knew more of her story. Does she know the new pope? Has she attended any of his services?

Perhaps it’s not important. But as I looked through today’s pages, that one brought me to a full stop. Which is the point, of course. Great job by the 108,548-circulation Boston Herald.

With the exception of Beaver County, all of these front pages are from the Newseum. Of course.

A look at today’s most outstanding Pope Benedict XVI pages

Huge news broke Monday morning: The Pope is resigning. Pope Benedict XVI will be the first pope in 598 years to resign, as opposed to dying in office.

This move — along with the baggage the Catholic church is carrying around these days — made for huge play atop page one of today’s New York Times.

130212PopeNYTimes

That picture by L’Osservatore Romano via the Associated Press was one of the few actual news photos I could find on today’s front pages, as collected this morning by the Newseum.

The Los Angeles Times used a picture from the same source and also shot fresh at the event Monday in which Pope Benedict made his surprise announcement.

130212PopeLATimes

The Times not only included sidebars on church politics but also on the ongoing sex abuse scandal. A large infographic shows the numbers and distribution of Catholic faithful throughout the world.

Average daily circulation for the L.A. Times is 616,575. The New York Times circulates 1,586,757 papers daily.

Most papers today did not use art shot during Monday’s event. I especially liked the tired expression in the file photo from Agence France-Presse, used today by the Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.

130212PopeNewarkNJ

That’s a great example of selecting a photo that fits perfectly with the quote superimposed over part of it.

Average daily circulation for the Star-Ledger is 278,940.

In a more humorous vein, I enjoyed the blue-collar sensibility reflected by the headlines afront today’s New York Post.

130212PopeNYPost

Average daily circulation for the Post is 555,327.

And while some papers speculated on page one that the next pope might be “from a developing nation,” none played up this angle as loudly as did the Philadelphia Daily News.

130212PopePhillyDN

That is Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson from Ghana in that AP file photo.

Average daily circulation for the Daily News is 110,000.

While several papers today created very nice page-one treatments of the Pope’s resignation, I feel like six were head-and-shoulders above the rest. Here’s a look at them…

#6

THE REPORTER

Fond du Lac, Wis.

Circulation: 10,186

The photo here — an AP file shot from 2005 — is wonderfully chosen and cropped. I also love the three little decks above the main headline that cite major elements of the story.

130212PopeFondDuLacWis

Note how the decks color-coordinate with the cape the pope is wearing.

The downside: The main headline tells us nothing new. That news was out at mid-morning Monday. It might have been better to write a headline that tried to give a little more perspective on the story or spun it forward just a bit.

Other than that, this page sings.

That page was designed in Gannett’s  Des Moines Design Studio by Wisconsin team leader Sean McKeown-Young and Brooke Curry,

Brooke, by the way, is currently a student at Grand View University in Des Moines and has been interning in the studio for a solid year, creative director Nathan Groepper tells us. Find her portfolio here.

#5

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Chicago, Ill.

Circulation: 414,590

As terrific as that last page was, here’s another wonderful one that is seemingly shot from the opposite angle.

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In fact, that’s a file photo by Franco Origlia of Getty Images. I don’t know the year.

The page was designed by Michelle Rowan and Ryan Smith, I’m told.

Honorable mention goes to Express — the commuter tab published in D.C. by the Washington Post — for getting great mileage out of that same picture today.

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Average daily distribution for Express is 183,916.

#4

DES MOINES REGISTER

Des Moines, Iowa

Circulation: 101,915

Designer Nicole Bogdas, working out of Gannett’s Des Moines center, tells us about the front page she built for today’s Register:

I think some folks here were skeptical at first when they saw just the photo, but after I put it together we agreed it was the way to go.

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When I was pitching it, I likened it to the famous Babe Ruth photo, and when I went home last night and described the photo to my boyfriend he said, “So, like the famous Babe Ruth photo.”

That would be this picture of Ruth shot at his last public appearance in 1948 by Nat Fein of the New York Herald Tribune.

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Fein won a Pulitzer Prize for that picture.

Find Nicole’s portfolio page here and her Twitter feed here.

That picture of the pope — file art by Gregorio Borgia of the Associated Press — was also used today to great effect by another Gannett Design Studio host paper, the Arizona Republic of Phoenix.

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Phoenix studio director Tracy Collins tells us the page was designed by Amy King. He asked Amy to tell us how her page came together:

I started looking through photos on the wire. George Berke (Republic team leader) and I talked possible options. We ran the chosen photo past the photo editor, who was a bit worried the image was too white, but saw its potential. The photo says it all. Pope: out. Mystery person: in.

We sent the copy editors and started brainstorming headline ideas.

Then George, Page 1 Editor Michael Squires and I huddled around my computer to discuss secondary display text – reading through the pope’s speech to find a good excerpt. Then a bit more photo editing to find a good image to pair with the quote.

I’ve written about Amy’s work at least three times. Find her statehood centennial pages here, an immigration law front page here and go here to find an interesting page on sexual assault.

Average daily circulation for the Republic is 321,600.

#3

VIRGINIAN-PILOT

Norfolk, Va.

Circulation: 142,476

One thing is consistent in this crazy newspaper world we live in: You can count on the Virginian-Pilot to do something interesting.

In this case, it was the Pilot‘s Bethany Bickley who put together this terrific front page.

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The first thing I though of this morning when I pulled the newspaper out of the wrapper and looked at the front was how much it reminded me of this:

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Just like that now-iconic Cleveland Plain Dealer front, the pope appears to be walking off the page. Note how Bethany turned the Pilot‘s nameplate white-on-white, with only a faint dropshadow to help it pop just a bit.

The picture itself is a 2010 file shot from the Associated Press. And at least two other papers also ran the picture huge on page one today:

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On the left is the 147,085-circulation Buffalo (N.Y.) News. On the right is the Daily Local News of West Chester, Pa., circulation 24,946.

Find Bethany’s online portfolio here, her NewspageDesigner gallery here and her Twitter feed here.

#2

DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE

Rochester, N.Y.

Circulation: 114,502

We’ve all seen pictures of the pope swinging burning incense. I never thought that an innovatively-cropped version of a picture of this might make for a nice front page presentation.

Joanne Sosangelis of Gannett’s Asbury Park studio did, however.

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Joanne tells us:

Well, it all started back in …

No, seriously, fellow team leader, Omar Vega, actually pulled the photo. He used a similar image that was horizontal for some of the papers he works with and I ended up choosing the vertical version — knowing that we don’t typically run wall-to-wall centerpieces on my team’s papers.

Rochester originally started with a tall centerpiece (three columns over four), very much like what we ran in Cherry Hill, Vineland and Westchester/Rockland. As the day progressed though, we began toying with losing the skybox and pushing the story up higher. Then we tried having the story above the nameplate, and then even under it, but wall-to-wall — and incorporating the nameplate (in white) into the art.

After showing several different options, our partners in Rochester decided they wanted to go full-page (minus the ad and index space) — and there was no argument from me!

The photo is a 2010 file shot by the Associated Press.

As she mentions, Joanne’s centerpiece found its way today to several other papers designed in that same studio:

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From left, those are:

  • The Asbury Park Press, circulation 98,032
  • The Vineland, N.J., Daily Journal, circulation 12,139
  • The Cherry Hill, N.J., Courier-Post, circulation 46,547
  • The While Plains, N.Y., Journal News, circulation 72,764

Find Joanne’s design portfolio here and her Twitter feed here.

And special kudos to the Free Press of Burlington, Vermont, for showing us how this same photo can be put to great use even in a tabloid format.

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Average daily circulation of the Burlington Free Press is 30,558.

#1

JOURNAL & COURIER

Lafayette, Ind.

Circulation: 25,531

My favorite front page of the day, however, is this one by yet another Gannett design studio.

I’m not a Catholic, nor am I a particularly religious man to begin with. But this presentation, I feel, is a wonderful blend of spiritual imagery, terrific cropping and design and perfect headline writing.

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That page was designed by Cait Palmiter of the Louisville Design Studio. Cait tells us:

The art that was chosen for the page was originally a photo from when Benedict first became pope, but Spencer (Holladay, Indiana team leader) said I should push for something else. I found a couple where he had his back turned because I loved the symbolism of it — him walking away, resigning. I showed them to my copy editor who said they still liked the other one.

I then sent an email explaining the idea to several people including the editor as well as three or four mock-ups that David Leonard created for the Louisville Courier Journal (not to be confused with Lafayette’s Journal and Courier!) and an explanation for why we should use a different photo, showing the Pope’s back.

130212PopeLouisvilleKy  130212PopeLafayetteInd

They came back and agreed! Persistence can pay off!

We used the basic idea of David’s mock-up and I worked with doing something a little more features-like with the headline.

It was a really satisfying page to design and I think the photo choice worked out very well. I credit Spencer with convincing me it was worth pushing, David for finding that photo, and the editors in Lafayette for being open to listening to what I had to say and changing their mind. One of the great things about the design hubs is the group of design-minded people to work with.

Great teamwork. You gotta love it.

Find Cait’s portfolio here and her Twitter feed here.

All of these front pages are from the Newseum. Of course.

Oh, no, New York Post. Really? You went there?

The only paper I can find in the Newseum today playing up the somewhat arbitrary — and frowned upon by most reputable meteorologists — name for this week’s winter storm bestowed upon it by the Weather Channel was the New York Post.

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Nemo bites. But not as much as the name Nemo does in the first place.

Boo, hiss, Post. Shame on you.

In a related issue, see that woman struggling with her umbrella? That was shot yesterday in Boston by Brian Snyder of Reuters. Snyder scored a triple word score with that picture today making the front of not only the Post but also the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

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If you add up the average daily circulation of all three papers, Snyder scored more than 4.25 million readers for his photo. In theory.

UPDATE – 8 p.m.

Add the Washington Post to that, please.

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That makes more than 4.76 million readers.

All three four of these page images are from the Newseum. Of course.

Read yesterday’s blog post here about the winter storm in the Northeast.

New York Times’ Style Magazine to launch redesign

The New York Times Style Magazine — better known as T — launches a redesign two weeks from Sunday with its first issue under newly-installed editor Deborah Needleman.

Images have leaked out already. Most of the buzz so far today has been about the cover logo.

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Yeah, I agree: I like the old one better, too. That chiseled look is so early 1990s. While the NYT “T” is classic.

On the other hand, I’m hardly the magazine’s target audience. So what do I know?

According to a story published last fall by NetNewsCheck, The new T will feature larger pages, more pages and higher-quality paper stock. On the other hand, print frequency will decrease by elimination of two of T‘s quarterly “design” issues.

Feb. 17 – Women’s fashion

March 10 – Men’s fashion

March 24 – Spring travel

April 14 – Design

May 12 – Summer travel

June 2 – Style

Sept. 15 – Men’s fashion

Oct. 6 – Travel

Oct. 20 – Design

Nov. 3 – Style

Nov. 17 – Travel

Dec. 8 – Holiday

Instead, NetNewsCheck reports, “design” content will be included in each issue of T.

I’m quite aware that’s only 12 issues, rather than 13 as NetNewsCheck reports. I’m not sure the reason for the discrepancy.

Find FishbowlNY‘s story here. Find T‘s official media kit here.

UPDATE – 4:20 p.m.

In particular, you might enjoy how the  Society for Professional Designers sounded off on this today.

Not exactly the way you want to be on page one of the N.Y. Times

Did you see skier Lindsey Vonn on the front of today’s New York Times?

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That’s her — that tiny little lump attached to the end of the cable hanging below that medical evacuation helicopter. Vonn was airlifted out of an Austrian mountainside venue Tuesday after she wiped out during the Alpine World Championships. She tore two ligaments in her knee, the Times reports, and fractured a bone in her leg. She’ll need reconstructive surgery, with the 2014 Olympics just one year away.

The photo is by Alexander Hassenstein of Getty Images.

I was immediately reminded of the time she crashed during the 2010 Olympic games in Vancouver. The Washington Post ran one of the largest photos I’ve ever seen on page one of that paper.

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Oof.

Find Lindsey Vonn’s official web page here.

Both today’s NYT front and the three-year-old WaPo front are from the Newseum. Of course.

The most-read thing on the front of the New York Times

From Jim Romenesko‘s blog this morning

New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson was Alec Baldwin’s guest on his Here’s the Thing radio show…

Q: What’s the first thing most people read in The Times they tell you?

A: The captions on the front page photos.

Yet, what is one of the last things we typically do when building a page? What is something way too many of us simply just cut-and–paste — and, if you’re lucky, edit lightly — before publishing?

Right.

Find the entire transcript here.

New York Times launches redesign of features sections with today’s Science Times

Stephanie Yera, communications coordinator for the New York Times company, tells us:

[Today’s] Science Times redesign is part of a redesign of a larger redesign across feature sections.  This is the first time since the sections debuted in the 1970s that all feature sections have been redesigned at once.

On the left, here, is last week’s Science Times. On the right is today’s page.

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The redesign, according to a press release…

…will continue to roll out this week with each day’s feature sections, from Wednesday’s “Dining” to Sunday’s “Arts & Leisure.”

Today’s example contains a row of refers across to top to increased content inside. To make room for this, the story count went from three to two, although that’s not necessarily going to stay that way every week.

Here’s a larger look at today’s front.

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Unchanged: The Times‘ typography — which, I’d argue, one just can’t improve upon — and the Times‘ lovely use of  visuals and white space.

The press release cites another improvements that started today:

“Well,” a self-contained pull-out spread dedicated to personal health, combining news briefs and shorts from the popular Well blog on NYTimes.com, running in Science Times

Here is today’s “Well.” Click either of these for a much larger view.

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Coming later this week, the Times reports:

  • “In Transit,” a revamped page with calendar items, including tips and deals, plus news briefs, running in Travel
  • “Vows,” retooled as a standalone package, like Well, now with highlights of quirky and eccentric weddings, running in Sunday Styles

Adrienne LaFrance of the Nieman Lab today interviewed Times art director Tom Bodkin about the changes. Find that here.

Here’s the press release in its entirety:

The New York Times Redesigns Its Feature Sections in Print

Tuesday’s “Science Times” is First Feature Section to Debut Print Redesign

NEW YORK, Jan. 22, 2013 – The New York Times has redesigned its feature sections in print.  The redesign, which began today with Tuesday’s “Science Times,” will continue to roll out this week with each day’s feature sections, from Wednesday’s “Dining” to Sunday’s “Arts & Leisure.”

The sections will deliver the same high-quality content Times readers enjoy, in a familiar but renewed format, as part of The Times’s continuing investment in its print product.

“We are devoted to an excellent reading experience for all Times readers, in print, online and across mobile,” said Jill Abramson, executive editor, The New York Times.  “Our paper is the cornerstone of our journalism, and this redesign speaks to our ongoing commitment to our valued print readers.”

The sections, created during the 1970’s, have each been refreshed and updated repeatedly over the years, but this is the first time all of the weekly feature sections have been redesigned as a whole.

“The New York Times is constantly evolving visually, both in print and online,” said Tom Bodkin, design director, The New York Times.  “The goal was not to create an entirely new look, but to develop a more coherent, accessible, underlying structure across all sections.”

The redesign introduces new tools to strengthen sections’ individual identities and to differentiate content types within sections.  Renewed packages and section content include:

  • “Well,” a self-contained pull-out spread dedicated to personal health, combining news briefs and shorts from the popular Well blog on NYTimes.com, running in Science Times
  • “In Transit,” a revamped page with calendar items, including tips and deals, plus news briefs, running in Travel
  • “Vows,” retooled as a standalone package, like Well, now with highlights of quirky and eccentric weddings, running in Sunday Styles

“With this redesign, our journalism will be even more accessible and, we hope, more dynamic,” said Rick Berke, an assistant managing editor who oversees The Times’s features departments and weekly sections.  “But we preserved and enhanced the content that our readers have long looked for in our print feature sections.  I can’t wait to see this all come together in Sunday’s paper.”

About The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT), a leading global, multimedia news and information company with 2011 revenues of $2.3 billion, includes The New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, NYTimes.com, BostonGlobe.com, Boston.com and related properties.  The Company’s core purpose is to enhance society by creating, collecting and distributing high-quality news and information.