You need a dirty mind to be a newspaper editor

This, I’m told, is making the rounds today in Britain.

1311DirtyMindEatOut

How, exactly, does someone not see that? I mean, really

The paper, I’m told, is the Irish Times of Dublin.

It’s been a while since I added to my collection of these. Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…


2012

Sept. 28: Louisville (Ky.) Courier Journal – This flunks the breakfast test.

July 6: Tampa Bay Times – A highly-specific duty on the ol’ campaign trail

July 5: Associated Press – Keep your headline away from my junk, please

May 31: Unknown newspaper – A headline too dirty even for Charles Apple? Not possible.

May 18: Coon Rapids, Iowa, Enterprise – We never had cheerleaders like this when I was in school.

May 11: Seattle Times – How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional.


2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb!

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful.

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis.

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. ExpressWay too much information, guys.

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided.

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot!

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools?


2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake.

Flunking the breakfast test

To an overworked copy editor, this headline might be a perfectly good way to tell — in very few words — what this story is about.

But to someone who didn’t read the story first? Not so much.

That ran in Thursday’s Louisville (Ky.) Courier Journal. If it makes you feel any better, the online version didn’t have the same problem.

Thanks to Melissa Kerney Umbarger of the Greensboro News & Record for reposting this via Facebook today.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

July 6: Tampa Bay Times – A highly-specific duty on the ol’ campaign trail

July 5: Associated Press – Keep your headline away from my junk, please

May 31: Unknown newspaper – A headline too dirty even for Charles Apple? Not possible.

May 18: Coon Rapids, Iowa, Enterprise – We never had cheerleaders like this when I was in school.

May 11: Seattle Times – How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional.

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb!

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful.

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis.

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. ExpressWay too much information, guys.

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided.

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot!

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools?

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake.

A highly-specific duty on the ol’ campaign trail

Stop the electronic presses: There’s a truly interesting presidential campaign headline today, from the Tampa Bay Times of St. Petersburg, Fla.

Wow. John Edwards, for one, would most certainly approve.

I understand what Ann Romney means when she says her job is to “unzip” her husband (those are, in fact, her own words). But an editor also has to know what kind of snickers a headline like that can get from readers.

But hey, perhaps that’s intentional. A headline like this can certainly help a story go viral.

Thanks to my speedy anonymous tipster for zipping me a message this morning.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

July 5: Associated Press – Keep your headline away from my junk, please

May 31: Unknown newspaper – A headline too dirty even for Charles Apple? Not possible.

May 18: Coon Rapids, Iowa, Enterprise – We never had cheerleaders like this when I was in school.

May 11: Seattle Times – How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional.

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb!

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful.

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis.

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. ExpressWay too much information, guys.

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided.

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot!

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools?

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake.

You need a dirty mind to be a wire editor

It’s nice to see that in this crazy, fast-paced world, genitalia still has value.

That rather interesting headline moved overnight via the Associated Press. Thanks to David Putney of the Virginian-Pilot for posting it to Facebook.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

May 31: Unknown newspaper – A headline too dirty even for Charles Apple? Not possible.

May 18: Coon Rapids, Iowa, Enterprise – We never had cheerleaders like this when I was in school.

May 11: Seattle Times – How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional.

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb!

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful.

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis.

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. ExpressWay too much information, guys.

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided.

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot!

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools?

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake.

You need a dirty mind to be a business editor

Lee Steele of Hearst’s Bridgeport, Conn., hub found this today, reposted it on his Facebook timeline and called it…

…A headline goof probably too dirty even for Charles Apple.

Heh. Wrong.

That’s pretty bad. Those of you considering phasing out your copy desks, take note: A newspaper or web site really needs to be able to catch something like this.

“RIM,” in fact, stands for Research In Motion — that’s the corporate parent of BlackBerry.

I’m not sure from which paper that came. It could have been just about anybody — that’s a Reuters story and even Reuters file art. But the story is most definitely from the past day or two.

Thanks to Lee for the tip.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

May 18: Coon Rapids, Iowa, Enterprise – We never had cheerleaders like this when I was in school.

May 11: Seattle Times – How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional.

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb!

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful.

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis.

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. ExpressWay too much information, guys.

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided.

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot!

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools?

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake.

You need a dirty mind to be a photo editor

An anonymous reader writes:

Hey, Charles. I’m a long-time reader, first-time submitter.

This is from a special graduation section in [Thursday’s] Coon Rapids Enterprise, a weekly in tiny Coon Rapids, Iowa. It’s part of a full-page photo montage.

I’m not sure what cheer this is, but it seems to have had quite an effect.

Oh, yeah. That’s a humdinger. Um, so to speak.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

May 11: Seattle Times – How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional.

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb!

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful.

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis.

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. ExpressWay too much information, guys.

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided.

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot!

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools?

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake.

Another “this HAS to be intentional” headline

But seriously: How on Earth could anyone write a headline like this unintentionally?

Just amazing.

This headline was posted Thursday afternoon and reportedly stood like that for a while until it was finally, mercifully, changed to something more benign. It was originally pointed out by James Taranto of the Wall Street Journal and then written about last night by Mediaite.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

May 4: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – Someone probably did, once they realized the word they had accidentally hidden in the headline.

April 20: Tampa Tribune – That’s one naughty-looking sandwich.

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

Everything should be copy-edited. Even ‘art heds.’ ESPECIALLY ‘art heds.’

That was the lesson learned today, I’d presume, by my friends at the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

A rather unfortunate thing happened with the cute reflection-in-the-water gimmick someone attempted on today’s features front. As you can see.

Yes, it does look almost like it says “shit yourself.” Obviously unintentional. But still: You have to watch out for things like this.

Jim Romenesko was all over this today, while I was out goofing around at the theater, watching the Avengers. He reported later that, at some point, someone noticed the problem and fixed it. Read about that here.

Along a similar vein: Back in February, we found a bad Roman numeral atop a Super Bowl sports front by the Republican of Springfield, Mass.

The correct numeral would have been XLVI. Which means 46.

Here’s what I wrote about this at the time:

The real lesson here: We ask our copy desk to read our stories and write and read our headlines. We can even print out infographics and have the copy desk read them as well.

But any art element at all that goes into the paper also needs to be checked over by the copy desk. Especially if it has type of any kind in it.

And that advice stands. You can’t have enough eyes on a page. Especially on your “big type.”

In addition to the Romenesko posts, find an interesting thread about the Pittsburgh page today at SportsJournalism.com.

You know who else needs a copy editor?

Local TV news operations. Chicago’s WMAQ-TV in particular. And Harrisburg’s Fox43 TV news. And Local 15 News in Mobile, Ala. And WBAL-TV in Baltimore. And Fox2Now in St. Louis. And KTLA channel 5 in Los Angeles. And Charlotte’s WBTV. And KXAN-TV of Austin. And Huntsville’s WAFF-TV. And Miami’s WSVN channel 7. And KCRG of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. And other local TV news operations. And CBS local media. And CBS/DC in Washington. And the web operation for DC101 radio. And the Huffington Post. And the Huffington Post again. And CNN (and CNN again)(and yet again)(and yet again) and CNN Money and CNN mobile and Fox News (and Fox News again)(and Fox News yet again)(and again!)(and again!)(and yet again!)(and yet again) and ABC News and the BBC and German news channel N24. And Fairfax media of New Zealand. And Dagsrevyen, the evening news broadcast of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corp. And Martha Stewart’s TV operation. And the Disney Channel. And AOL. And creators of mobile apps. And Yahoo News. And Yahoo News again. And Google News’ ‘bots. And Baseball jersey manufacturers. And Georgetown University. And Kansas State University. And the University of Iowa. And the University of North Carolina. And Nebraska Wesleyan University. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Washington Nationals (boy, do they need a copy editor). And the National Hockey League. And ESPN (and ESPN again)(and yet again)(and yet again)(and three more times!)(and yet again) and Fox Sports (and Fox Sports again)(and Fox Sports one more time). And CBS Sportsline. And Sports Illustrated. And college athletic department ticket offices. And the NCAA. And Leaf trading card company. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And the makers of Sudafed. And Borders bookstore. And the U.S. Postal Service. And government agencies and political candidates. And Tea Party candidates. And the Newt Gingrich campaign. And the White House. And the Vice President. And city and county Boards of Elections. Both the state of Pennsylvania and its department of transportation. And Costa Cruises. And Pittsburgh skywriters. And road paving contractors in Durham, N.C. and in New York City. And the city of Norfolk, Va. And the Ohio Dept. of Transportation. And the West Palm Beach, Fla., police dept. And Lakewood High School in St. Petersburg, Fla. And South African traffic cops. And the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico. And gas stations. And billboard companies. And bumper sticker manufacturers. And sign painters. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.” And T-shirt designers. And more T-shirt designers. And Old Navy. And Adidas. And Mazda. And rubber stamp designers. And glass etchers. And Starbucks. And Wendy’s. And restaurants, breakfast joints, Chinese restaurants and cake decorators. And more cake decorators. And drive-in movie theater managers. And auto dealers. And romance novelists. And Capcom, the makers of Resident Evil video games. And American Idol. And book cover designers. And editorial cartoonists. And South Africa’s New Age and Sunday Independent newspapers. And Dublin’s Sunday Business Post. And the Echo of Gloucestershire, England. And the London Daily Mail. And the South China Morning Post. And the Washington Post (Hey! Another repeat offender!), the Post‘s Express tab (Hey! Yet another repeat offender!), the Washington Examiner, the New York Times (Wow! Yet another repeat offender!)(Hey! A third offense!), the New York Post, Wall Street Journal Europe, Newsday, USA Today, the Chicago Sun-Times (And yet another!), the Daily Herald of Arlington Heights, Ill., the Rochester, N.Y., Democrat & Chronicle, the Daily Mail of London, the Seattle Times, the weekly Manila Mail of San Francisco, the Miami Herald (and again!), the Portland Oregonian, the Durham, N.C., Herald-Sun, the News & Observer of Raleigh, N.C., the Chapel Hill, N.C., News, the Missoula, Mont., Missoulian, the Duluth, Minn., News Tribune, the Springfield (Mass.) Republican, the Bangor (Maine) Daily News, the Times-Record of Denton, Md., the News-Herald of Willoughby, Ohio, the Reporter of Lansdale, Pa., the Times-News of Erie, Pa., the Wilmington, Del., News Journal, the Amarillo (Texas) Globe News, the Laredo Morning Times, the Daily Telegram of Temple, Texas, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Waynesboro News Virginian, the Virginian-Pilot (and the Virginian-Pilot again), the Des Moines Register, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, Gannett’s N.Y. Central Media hub, the Greenville (S.C.) News, the Daily Herald of Provo, Utah, the Deseret News of Salt Lake City, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Fort Collins Coloradoan, the Olympian of Olympia, Wash., the Carbondale, Ill., Southern Illinoisian, the Lakeland (Fla.) Ledger (Hey! Yet another repeat offender!) and the Canarsie Courier of New York City. And Politico. And the Associated Press. And the Associated Press again. And the Associated Press again. And Mann’s Jeweler’s Accent magazine. And New Scientist magazine. And Investment News magazine. And Time magazine (and Time magazine again).

And, of course, I need a copy editor myself.

I’ve always needed a copy editor. Which is why you’ll see me fight so hard for them.

Today’s most interesting front-page illustration

A noted visual journalist — one I shall not name — writes this morning:

Maybe I have a dirty mind (which makes me a good copy editor, right?), but I do NOT think sandwich when I look at this.

I mean, I get what they were trying to do, but …

The page to which she refers is this one by the Tampa Tribune:

Heh.

Average daily circulation for the Tribune is 138,172.

The page image is from the Newseum. Of course.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

April 6: NBA.com – Yet another word to stay away from in a headline.

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

You need a dirty mind to be an editor…

OK, folks, I realize that “facial” might be a term that’s used mostly in pornography.

But, still. Anyone who’s worked in media even a brief time has had enough pop culture exposure to recognize it as a word from which to stay away when writing a headline.

Right?

Unless you just want everyone snickering at you.

That’s NBA.com, earlier today. Apparently, someone got smart and either deleted the story or changed the headline. It was there this morning but I can’t find it at all now.

Thanks to Kurt Cunningham of the Munster, Ind., Times of Northwest Indiana for the tip.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

April 5: Mouse Works books – Nothing but natural ingredients for this bear cook.

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

You need a dirty mind to be an editor

I mean, really. How could anyone approve this book title?

Yet it was approved. And published. Back in 1995 — not last year, as Entertainment Weekly suggested recently.

Thanks to James Molnar of the Toledo (Ohio) Free Press for the tip.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

April 2: MSN Now – Is this headline for real? I’m afraid it is. And it’s intentional.

March 20: Canada’s Wildrose Party – The wheels on the campaign bus go ’round and ’round…

Feb. 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

Is this MSN Now headline for real?

Danielle Morris — a senior at Ohio University — writes tonight:

I was just browsing MSN‘s Now website and found this peculiar headline… I can’t decide if it was meant to be dirty or if the person writing it didn’t have a dirty mind. Thought you’d find it funny!

Yep. That’s funny. And also suspicious. Looks to me like a bold but questionable grab at some interesting SEO traffic.

And yes, the headline is still there. In fact, as I roam around the MSN Now site, I see a lot of bold but questionable headlines.

Conclusion: This site — which I never visit — is aimed at being edgy and a talker. I have to assume that headline is simply business as usual.

You need a dirty mind to… design the side of a campaign bus?

This is either the world’s greatest political ad plastered on the side of this bus. Or the world’s stupidest.

That’s the official campaign bus for Wildrose party leader Danielle Smith of Alberta, Canada. The photo went viral Monday in the worst way.

Graham Thomson of the Edmonton Journal writes:

If you’ve ever suspected Twitter was invented by 13-year-old boys with a limited vocabulary and overactive imaginations, Monday was proof.

Exactly.

In defense of 13-year-old boys everywhere, though, I’d argue: That poor photo placement is pretty obvious. How did someone in the campaign not notice?

The story — and that picture — was played at the bottom of page one of today’s Journal

…which also happened to be the launch issue of a redesign. Read more about that here.

Find Thomson’s column here.

You need a dirty mind to be a copy editor

There’s probably not a lot you can do to insulate the name of Washington state Congressman Norm Dicks from sixth-grader snickering.

So perhaps it’s a good thing that he’s retiring. Because when I saw this today…

…all I could see was this:

Find the story here by the Olympian‘s Rob Hotakainen.

The page image is from the Newseum. Of course.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

Feb 27: Weld for Birmingham – There’s no way this headline wasn’t intentional

2011

Dec. 7: Waitrose Weekend – “The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen”

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – Stop using this word as a verb

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

Aug. 26: Portland Oregonian – This headline should have been avoided

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

2010

Aug. 30: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

There’s just no way this headline wasn’t intentional

This wickedly funny headline comes from Second Front, the political blog of the alternative online magazine known as Weld for Birmingham.

I spent some time poking around that site last night and I couldn’t find any other headlines that struck me nearly as edgy as that one. So perhaps this was purely a coincidence.

Or not. Most likely not.

UPDATE – 5:20 p.m.

Jim Romenesko contacted Weld for Birmingham‘s Kyle Whitmire who tells him, in part:

I thought a few folks might get a chuckle out of it. We try to have a sense of humor, and the double entendre was too hard to resist. In Alabama, it’s the only way to stay sane sometimes.

…Also, to get the joke, you have to have a dirty mind.

Yep.

Find Weld for Birmingham here. Read a little more about it here. Find the Second Front blog here.

Thanks much to the three folks who sent me copies of this Sunday.

For your consideration…

The HappyPlace blog calls this…

The most accidentally pornographic pile of newspapers ever seen.

Most definitely unintentional. How many of us stop to think about what a front-page photo would look like when papers are bundled or stacked?

The Waitrose Weekend is an in-house organ (sorry) published by a grocery chain in Bracknell, Berkshire, an hour or so west of London. Find the Waitrose web site here. Find the Waitrose Weekend site here.

As far as I can tell, the picture was originally posted yesterday by Jamie Lee Curtis Taete in the U.K. and then reposted by various blogs and web sites including Happy Place and BuzzFeed.

Thanks to Jay Anthony of St. Petersburg, Fla. — who, like me, has the maturity of a sixth grader — for bringing it to my attention.

Previous “you need a dirty mind” howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

Dec. 3: Washington Examiner – It’s time we stopped using “finger” as a verb

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

Aug. 30, 2010: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10, 2010: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

You need a dirty mind to be an editor

Once upon a time, “finger” was a word that made a perfectly good verb in a news headline: To identify.

But no longer. I’m talking to you, Washington Examiner.

Yeah, I should have posted this yesterday. So sue me. Or, better yet — finger me.

The page image is from the Newseum. Of course.

Previous howlers for that sixth-grader in us all…

Nov. 15: The Manila Mail – Double word score!

Nov. 13: MSNBC – Regardless, it still sounds painful

Sept. 19: CBS Local Media – What goes on in Minneapolis stays in Minneapolis

Sept. 9: Cincinnati.com – Does the president know about this?

Sept. 7: D.C. Express – Way too much information, guys

July 6: USA Today – No wonder the sun’s so hot

Feb. 3: Gloucestershire (U.K.) Echo – What’s special about girls’ schools

Aug. 30, 2010: Skyway Drive-In – Vampires suck who?

Aug. 10, 2010: New York Times – The late, great trouser snake

Why the Bay-area Manila Mail needs a copy editor with a dirty mind

Or, at least, an editor who’s spent a little time kicking around the internet.

Check out this headline on the front of a recent edition of the Manila Mail, a weekly based in San Francisco and aimed at the Filipino market.

That’s a double word score of sorts for anyone with a dirty mind. Both “MILF” and “FAP” are acronyms for R-rated phrases. And the latter, in fact, is a typo.

MILF, in this case, means Moro Islamic Liberation Front, a militant group based in the southern islands of the Philippines. But in fact, it also means something entirely different — to U.S. readers under a certain age, perhaps.

And AFP means the Armed Forces of the Philippines. However, that’s not the way it’s spelled here, of course. FAP means something entirely different — again, to the internet culture.

The page was posted Monday at Reddit. Thanks much to Ryan Smith of the New Orleans Times-Picayune for tweeting this last night.

You know who else needs a copy editor?

Local TV news operations. Chicago’s WMAQ-TV in particular. And Harrisburg’s Fox43 TV news. And Local 15 News in Mobile, Ala. And Fox2Now in St. Louis. And KTLA channel 5 in Los Angeles. And Charlotte’s WBTV. And other local TV news operations. And CBS local media. And the web operation for DC101 radio. And CNN and CNN Money and Fox News (and Fox News again) and ABC News and the BBC and German news channel N24. And Martha Stewart’s TV operation. And the Disney Channel. And creators of mobile apps. And Google News’ ‘bots. And Baseball jersey manufacturers. And Georgetown University. And Kansas State University. And the University of Iowa. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Washington Nationals (boy, do they need a copy editor). And the National Hockey League. And Fox Sports. And college athletic department ticket offices. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And the makers of Sudafed. And Borders bookstore. And the U.S. Postal Service. And government agencies and political candidates. And Tea Party candidates. And the White House. And city and county Boards of Elections. Both the state of Pennsylvania and its department of transportation. And Pittsburgh skywriters. And road paving contractors. And the city of Norfolk, Va. And the Ohio Dept. of Transportation. And South African traffic cops. And gas stations. And billboard companies. And sign painters. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.” And T-shirt designers. And more T-shirt designers. And Old Navy. And rubber stamp designers. And glass etchers. And Starbucks. And restaurants, breakfast joints, Chinese restaurants and cake decorators. And more cake decorators. And drive-in movie theater managers. And romance novelists. And South Africa’s New Age and Sunday Independent newspapers. And Dublin’s Sunday Business Post. And the Echo of Gloucestershire, England. And the South China Morning Post. And the Washington Post (Hey! A repeat offender!), the Post‘s Express tab (Hey! Another repeat offender!) the New York Times (Yet another repeat offender!), the New York Post, Wall Street Journal Europe, Newsday, USA Today, the Chicago Sun-Times (And yet another!), the Daily Herald of Arlington Heights, Ill., the Rochester, N.Y., Democrat & Chronicle, the Seattle Times, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Miami Herald, the Portland Oregonian, the Durham, N.C., Herald-Sun, the Chapel Hill, N.C., News, the Missoula, Mont., Missoulian, the Times-Record of Denton, Md., the News-Herald of Willoughby, Ohio, the Amarillo (Texas) Globe News, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Waynesboro News Virginian, the Virginian-Pilot, the Des Moines Register, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, Gannett’s N.Y. Central Media hub, the Daily Herald of Provo, Utah, the Carbondale, Ill., Southern Illinoisian and the Canarsie Courier of New York City. And the Associated Press. And Mann’s Jeweler’s Accent magazine. And Investment News magazine. And Time magazine.

You need a dirty mind to be an editor

I’ve written a number of times here in the blog about how it’s vital that your copy desk is staffed with people with dirty minds.

Without that kind of critical eye, you’re doomed to put things into your paper — or onto your web site — that makes the eighth-grader in all of us snicker.

For MSNBC, today is one of those days.

Aw, man. No further comment.

Thanks to Charlynn Schmiedt of the Casper, Wyo., Star-Tribune, for catching this today.

We’ve seen over and over and over and over and over and over again: It’s very easy to be naughty or suggestive without really meaning to.

Why CBS Local Media needs a copy editor (preferably one with a dirty mind)

CBS Local Media — which supplies web content to local stations, including WCCO-TV Channel 4 in Minneapolis — needs a copy editor to keep it from writing unintentionally hilarious headlines.

Like this one from last night:

It certainly gets your attention, does it not?

At some point between now and then, they fixed it. Thankfully.

It’s not just important to have a copy editor. But that copy editor must be someone with a dirty mind. Because — as we’ve seen over and over and over and over again this summer — it’s very easy to be naughty or suggestive without really meaning to.

Thanks to my anonymous correspondent for the tip.

You know who else needs a copy editor?

Local TV news operations. Chicago’s WMAQ-TV in particular. And Harrisburg’s Fox43 TV news. And Local 15 News in Mobile, Ala. And other local TV news operations. And CNN and CNN Money and Fox News (and Fox News again) and the BBC and German news channel N24. And Martha Stewart’s TV operation. And the Disney Channel. And creators of mobile apps. And Google News’ ‘bots. And Baseball jersey manufacturers. And Georgetown University. And Kansas State University. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Washington Nationals (boy, do they need a copy editor). And the National Hockey League. And Fox Sports. And college athletic department ticket offices. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And the makers of Sudafed. And Borders bookstore. And the U.S. Postal Service. And government agencies and political candidates. And Tea Party candidates. And city and county Boards of Elections. Both the state of Pennsylvania and its department of transportation. And road paving contractors. And the city of Norfolk, Va. And the Ohio Dept. of Transportation. And South African traffic cops. And gas stations. And billboard companies. And sign painters. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.” And T-shirt designers. And more T-shirt designers. And Old Navy. And rubber stamp designers. And glass etchers. And Starbucks. And restaurants, breakfast joints, Chinese restaurants and cake decorators. And more cake decorators. And drive-in movie theater managers. And romance novelists. And South Africa’s New Age and Sunday Independent newspapers. And Dublin’s Sunday Business Post. And newspapers in the U.K. And the Washington Post (Hey! A repeat offender!), the Post‘s Express tab, the New York Times (Hey! Another repeat offender!), the New York Post, Wall Street Journal Europe, Newsday, USA Today, the Chicago Sun-Times (Yet another repeat offender!), the Rochester, N.Y., Democrat & Chronicle, the Seattle Times, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Portland Oregonian, the Missoula, Mont., Missoulian, the Times-Record of Denton, Md., the Amarillo (Texas) Globe News, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Waynesboro News Virginian, the Virginian-Pilot, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, the Carbondale, Ill., Southern Illinoisian and the Canarsie Courier of New York City. And the Associated Press. And Mann’s Jeweler’s Accent magazine. And Investment News magazine. And Time magazine.