You need a dirty mind to be an editor, part four…

This one came in last night while I was watching the Packers hold off the Saints.

It’s yet another example of a headline that, to some people, looks just fine. But to someone with even a slightly dirty mind, it’s a scream.

That was found yesterday at the Cincinnati Enquirer‘s web site. Thanks much to my anonymous tipster.

I guess I have two questions here…

1. What else could this headline have said instead? “Mallory to watch speech from VIP seats,” perhaps? “Mallory to be First Lady’s guest at speech tonight“?

2. Am I posting too many of these things now? Geez, I’m wondering if I should start a Tumblr blog of nothing but dirty-sounding, unintentional double entendré-containing headlines.

Either that, or I should put an R rating on this blog.

The D.C. Express headline I posted on Wednesday found its way to both Boing Boing and to Fark, although I suspect those sites picked it up directly, rather than from this blog. The infamous USA Today weather graphic from July, however, was stolen from here.

Not complaining or anything. Just taking note.

You need a dirty mind to be an editor, part three…

Is it my imagination? Or are “naughty” — intentional or not — headlines finding their way into newspapers more often these days?

The one making the rounds today is this one, from today’s Express, the free daily youth + commuter tabloid published in the D.C. area by the Washington Post.

Jesus. What were they thinking?

An anonymous source sent me that picture a short while ago. But there are plenty zooming around Twitter and Facebook today. One of my favorites was presented with the editorial comment:

Seriously? Nobody at the Washington fucking Post saw a problem with this headline?

Heh.

Here’s the entire page. Click for a readable version.

The word “taint” appears nowhere in the story. I can only assume they meant “tent.” Which might make this — I dunno — Typo of the Year or something.

Either that, or this was intentional. Surely not, though. Surely not.

Just last week, the Portland Oregonian ran this deliciously filthy sports headline that just can’t possibly have been unintentional. But perhaps was.

And back in July, USA Today seemed as if it was entering the world of cartoon porn with this weather graphic. I know for a fact that one was unintentional. But still.

You need a dirty mind to be an editor, part two…

You must have a dirty mind to work in this business.

If not, then things like this headline might slip right past you.

That was a headline in the Portland Oregonian. Reportedly on Friday, Aug. 26.

Granted, that’s a school nickname that is highly susceptible to accidental naughty puns. But still. It’s very hard difficult to look at this one and think it wasn’t intentional.

I’m sure it wasn’t, though. Because no one just wants to be fired.

Thanks to the half-dozen or so folks who passed it along to me last night.

Go here to find other cases of — unintentional, I’m quite sure — naughty things that have made it into newspapers lately.

You need a dirty mind to be an editor in this business

That’s the only way you can avoid running something like this graphic — cell-camera shots of which have been zooming around the internets over the past day or so.

(Pause for laughter.)

It’s from the USA Today weather page, of course. It ran last Friday, July 1. Click for a larger look. If you need a larger look.

Now, chances are about five percent of you don’t “get” what I’m talking about with that graphic illustration. But at least 95 percent of you do — in fact, you’re laughing like mad right now. Which proves my point.

You need to have a dirty mind to be in the business of mass communications. Or, at the very least, you need someone with a dirty mind on your staff. Because you do not want to give the sixth grader in all of us this kind of viral amusement.

We’ve seen things like this before, of course. Like last summer, when the New York Times illustrated a story on appendicitis with what appears to be a “pocket snake”:

Or in February, when an English newspaper used an unfortunate combination of words to refer to a quote from a school headmaster…

Or even when a drive-in movie theater tried to list two movies on a sign clearly made for only one.

You must have a dirty mind. Unless you want everyone in town laughing at you.

Thanks to Ernie Smith of the ShortFormBlog for bringing this to my attention last night.

And thanks to my anonymous tipster for the clean copy. You can barely read those lousy cell camera shots going around.

Needed: A copy editor with a filthy mind

It’s imperative that copy editors have dirty, filthy, perverted minds.

Because that’s the only way you’re going to avoid running a headline like this:

That ran Friday in the Southern Illinoisian of Carbondale, Ill., circulation 26,810. That’s the professional paper — not the student paper at Southern Illinois University. For the record. Find the online version — which uses the same headline — here.

Yes, I also posted a similar howler last week.

Thanks to my tipster… Whose name I seem to have misplaced.

You know who else needs copy editors? Local TV news operations. And other local TV news operations. And Baseball jersey manufacturers. And Kansas State University. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings and the St. Louis Cardinals. And college athletic department ticket offices. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And Borders bookstore. And Tea Party candidates. And city and county Boards of Elections. And Google News’ ‘bots. And billboard companies. And sign painters. And rubber stamp designers. And restaurants, breakfast joints and cake decorators. And the Washington Post, the New York Times, the New York Post, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Virginian-Pilot, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, CNN and Time magazine. And newspapers in the U.K. And drive-in movie theater managers. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.” And T-shirt designers. And road paving contractors.

Why U.K. newspapers need copy editors

Papers in the British Isles need copy editors — specifically, copy editors with dirty minds – to keep them from making enormously embarrassing goofs like this one:

This beauty ran Wednesday in the Echo of Gloucestershire, England.

In case you’re wondering, the word “head” refers to the attribution of the info in the rest of the headline. In this case, it’s from the headmaster.

Check out the online version:

Thanks to the anonymous tipster in London who sent this to us.

You know who else needs copy editors? Local TV news operations. And other local TV news operations. And Baseball jersey manufacturers. And Kansas State University. And the New York Jets, the Minnesota Vikings and the St. Louis Cardinals. And college athletic department ticket offices. And the Virginia general assembly. And college alumni magazines. And pharmacies. And Borders bookstore. And Tea Party candidates. And city and county Boards of Elections. And Google News’ ‘bots. And billboard companies. And sign painters. And rubber stamp designers. And restaurants, breakfast joints and cake decorators. And the Washington Post, the New York Times, the New York Post, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Virginian-Pilot, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, CNN and Time magazine. And drive-in movie theater managers. And Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.” And T-shirt designers. And road paving contractors.

Why drive-in movie theater managers need copy editors

They need copy editors — and specifically copy editors with dirty minds — to keep them from making mistakes like this one:

That is a drive-in theater in Warren, Ohio. The photo was apparently taken this week. Those two movies are still playing (as of this weekend).

This was originally posted on Reddit by ZachSka87.

A while back we looked at a few road signs that included misspelled words. Here’s a fresh one from Charlotte, N.C.:

That one comes from Justin Ruckman of the CltBlog.

You know who else needs copy editors? Home Depot and manufacturers of “hoodies.” And CNN. And college athletic department ticket offices. And road paving contractors. And restaurants. And cake decorators. And baseball jersey manufacturers. And T-shirt designers. And Time magazine. And sign painters. And cake decorators. And T-shirt designers. And baseball jersey manufacturers.

For your consideration…

An illustration in Monday’s New York Times (click for a larger view):

The story by Tara Parker-Pope is about appendicitis and how it can sneak up on you. The illustration, though — credited to Ellen Weinstein — well, let’s just say that they might need more editors at the Times with dirty minds.

Pocket snakes. I mean, really.

Read the story online — and see a color version of the illustration — here.

Thanks to my anonymous tipster for the photo.